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up the stairs anymore. they used the network to build her a ramp on saturday afternoon. they use files to share information about her and a place where she keeps her personal information. she has advanced directives, medical records, and so on that is not accessible to everybody in the network, but some of the members. there are stories and photos, a place where people can celebrate today, how to share memories, have the good times that were the essence in the past and in the present. you might be asking yourself this question, if you are a facebook user, how is different from facebook. it is what we called open social networking, and it is designed to create many relationships. this is closed and personal, it is an intimate space. i have a daughter that was close to 1000 facebook friends. it has no advertisements. no data mining, it is private and secure. it bridges the formal and informal world of care and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and y
and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we u
of the people, all of the different starting up companies here and those that are inventing with us, thank them for celebrating innovation month in such a exemplary way. and i think we're going to have a lot more to announce before this month is out, including on our way to the world series. thank you very much. (applause) >> now, if i may introduce our partner in crime here, board president david chiu who is also going to be complimenting us with all of his efforts at the board. come on up, david. (applause) >> good morning. i am incredibly excited to be here today for a couple of reasons. first of all, the hatchery is one of my favorite places in the city. there is truly a bee hive of activity of the newest innovations that san francisco will be famous for. i also love the fact that just a couple of blocks from here is where our san francisco giants are moving on to the world series. but just in this room, all of you are giants and making sure that san francisco is the world champion when it comes to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a techno
spokesman in the state and reverend brown and used his zeal and intelligence, his will to fight. he is a preacher, pastor, teacher, musician and a san francisco giant fanatic. [applause] and to all of you here today this issue of violence is a complex and challenging one. no one need to be self rightious about it because there is no instant answer to the things that all of us must. do i am impressed with the religious communities coming together. at least we should know that the issue today is peace is not the absence of noise. it's the presence of justice. when there is no justice there is no peace and when there is poverty and pain people search out for a bomb and put off that bomb. the excitement is that we're here today with each other. we at best can reach out to those who are not here because it's not just a matter can be solved with an enlightened church. the killing in kansas city, a football player, his wife and himself. three or 4 nfl players say they carry a gun and with basketball players the same. somewhere we're sitting around watching san francisco play mi
and to commercial and industrial uses in 2001 and residential uses in 2005 and hotel uses most recently in 2012. now i'm going to look at how our proposal would update the requirements. this proposal would include several requirements based on two bicycle typing types, class 1 and class 2 class 1 bicycle parking is secured, indoor parking targeted for long-term use usually by residents or employees. class 2 targeted short-term use, usually for visitors and can be located indoor or outdoor. requirements would require calibrating parking requirements based on the characteristic of use. for example, office uses will have more employees than visitors, than the requirement for class 1 will be higher. for personal services such as a gym, there would be more visitors and employees and class 2 requirements would be higher. our proposal would overall increase bicycle parking requirements. forresidential uses, existing requirements are one per two units. which is really low, compared to comparable cities and contemporary green standards. small projects of four units are less would not be required to provide
owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to protect your home but the days of staying and defending your home and killing our fire fighters are done. we will not stand and defend a house that has not been prepared by a land owner and die for it. we don't do that any more. that's one of our doctrinal changes and we set forth some new guidelines with that. >>
property truly value its quiet residential character and at the cost of losing a use of a vintage house. the relocation results in the addition of only .5 fte, the existing staff of the school would simply remain with one employee moving from part-time to full-time. no new jobs created for our neighborhood. with respect to the need for additional child-care in our neighborhood, we contacted the children's council of san francisco, a very respected third party referral organization, whose database included 70% of san francisco's child-care facilities and they informed us that their 95 facilities with at least one actual opening for children 2-5 years old within our zip codes and many openings include family child-care centers just like the applicant's preschool. i would urge the commission of what they offer. many providing bilingual services as working capital. we appreciate the applicant's offer to give them their cell phone numbers for blocking sidewalks and driveways and double parking, but blocking sidewalks and driveways and double parking is unlawful. such an offer doesn't
juvenile probation, commanders and briefs and we appreciate each of the city leaders being with us this morning. i am joined by joseph brian and the paster of the church works with the rainbow coalition. >> good afternoon. what a pleasure it is to be here and the patron saint of this great city work in the words of a prayer. lord, make me an instrument of your peace. as we look the things we realize the up tick of vlz is real and as we unified from all denominations and practices and speak simply. peace on earth and may this season be about peace. i commend mayor lee and work with him and resource ourselves and connect ourselves those in the city that believe our city can be a city of peace. as part of the rainbow coalition it's an honor to hold this today and jesse jackson and against violence prevention and that we can represent that well in the season of peace and we bring forward carolyn scott for our opening prayer of this peace hour. >> thank you reverend bryant. bow your heart with me. a discussion on the importance of interface based leadership on the city's violence
it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned today is the chance it meet
in the marine corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this
participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-c
in developing this. so, as far as creating access to the public, using the open data sets, and creating exposure to neighborhoods that you probably traditionally didn't even think were there, we realized there were 1200 different facilities all through the park -- all through the city as we were going out to explore. and upon our own discovery, and i being a local native, i didn't know about 800 of them. so, as we move forward into the future, taking this, working with some other departments like san francisco arts, we're creating access for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch
training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up
these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i will be working and not fooling around. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share i
francisco see not only what the military can bring to the party and help us with, not only how we can interact with the military, but also we say to ourselves, it's also up to us to do everything we can for ourselves. we're not kind of an outfit, it's easier for them to collaborate with us. so, all of these things are important to us as we have these exercises. so, i say this is a very worthwhile enterprise that will keep going. i tip my hat to my friend mike who really has been leading us in these efforts. and now i say as also the slogan, i guess you call it this morning, maybe it's what the navy says. i think it's a very good phrase. a global force for good. that's what we've been practicing, a global force for good. thank you. (applause) >> thank you, sir. thank you. thank you very much, sir. (applause) >> and for all of you, tomorrow we're going to have the former secretary defense william perry speak. and the final speaker tomorrow will be the commander of north com, it will be the first time the northern command... >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to day two of the senior leade
found. the cost was close to 30 billion u.s. dollars. how we organize, well, we have something similar that you have. we have the national emergency office under the internal affair minister and they have offices in the different counties, in the different places in chile this emergency office request aid directly to the joint chief of staff and joint chief of staff to the army, navy or air force and then we move the pieces to put the aid where they need it. the scenario, the beginning when we face this was the same thing we are talking about in this seminar. the necessity was access because everything was, the delivery was absolutely hampered because of the roads so we have to clean it. water, food, electricity and communications. another need at that time to do that is field hospital generators, housing, sat coms, purifying water systems and mobile bridges. so the force was at the beginning just to distribute the aid and at the end start doing law enforcement when the government declared catastrophe and the president gave us the authority to do that. so we move the army inland, n
than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap? ♪ i need some help. my brain elasticity is not too god. i -- go
why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> th
and texture and color of san francisco. so, all of us can stop looking at the death of george moscone and start to put him firmly in our hearts so we can see the likes of him in new community leaders, young artists, queer and colorful, innovators and students, all inside our magnificently and uniquely diverse and never-changing city. san francisco will never be what it was, nothing in life will be. but as i heard recently, we are always nostalgic for a time that never was and often wanting to avoid a future that is inevitable. will change in san francisco as in everywhere is inevitable. and change can be beautiful. we are all of us the agents of change. as george and harvey were. each one of us is the story teller of our lives and the lives of the people we've lost. and that wasn't always the case, as willie mentioned. but because of the likes of george and harvey and so many others, all the way to our mayor ed lee, all of us have voice. all of us can tell the story. so, let's crowd source this thing. let's tell the real stories of george and harvey. stories of their hard work and pol
things don't always go as planned and certainly our experiences in combat has showed us there and prior experience with disasters have outlined that even though there's a well-defined system of response it doesn't always work out. what i defined yesterday was that logistics problems may get in the way and interfere with medical surge planning as is outlined. putting resources where they are needed in a huge disaster may outstrip the ability of local authorities to do that because roads are out. the niche we have as the marine corps assets we have the ability to locate some of our resources like shock trauma platoons, that's what we do in combat and we have experience with that and that may be something that may be of benefit to this process. >> during the last panel, mr. cahen mentioned it's so important to understand the resources that his agency has versus the ones that the military has and he said at one point they started looking down in terms of typing, i have this, you have this, how are we going to respond and get the resources we need to deal with the incident. i'd like to hea
an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to see the mother rise. it is an important way for all of us to be able to connect with our families and with our communities. for americans living with disabilities, many of whom are also aging americans, broadband and commuters -- computers can provide even more critical tools for health and wellness. they allow someone with a speech impairment to e-mail her doctor, a person who is mobility limited to its in glasses -- classes online, and for someone else to work at home. 29% of people with disabilities would join the work force if telecommuting were actually a viable option for them. before working at home, however, broadband is now a necessity for anyone searching for a job. many job openings are only posted online. about 80% of fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. and about 60% of working americans use the internet as an integral part of their jobs every single day. if you do not have broadband, you are increasingly cut off from these opportunities.
mr. adams stated. gemly you are not allowed to use subsidized units for your inclusionary units unless you are a california debt limit allocation project using 4% credits. so that will be in your next all right, but it's also reflected in this new procedures manual. so it's a small technicality, but for some projects, you will be able to have a slight subsidy, but you have to provide more units at deeper affordable. >> commissioner borden? >> i wanted to thank you -- i was one of the commissioners who asked for a lot of this data and i do hope that you work more around the issue that you talk you ed about. it seems like that fica score issue would be a problem and i understand it could be a problem with public housing as well and that is something that we need to be more proactive in working with tenants. and so i don't know to the extent that the housing trust fund legislation, i don't think it ever really dealt with that issue, but it might be something to look at from a larger policy standpoint. >> certainly. >> so i appreciate that. in terms of the pipeline of the 120
and tell us we need 10, 12, 15, it's our obligation to put that together and get it to them. they are worried about the incident in their jurisdiction which they have to correct. it's our responsibility to reach bond those borders as their extension to bring in the reserves that they need to maintain that kaupblt newt of operation and then where we function through the state utility operations center and the state operations center to make sure that we have that kind of access and that kind of assistance. we need caltrans, we're going to need chp, we're going to need cal fire, we need dwr, they are invested in restoring their critical infrastructure and it's our responsibility to reach across those lines to get that kind of access to keep that kind of restoration underway. >> thank you. mr. brig. >> in terms of establishing standards for resill yepbs, absolutely, we have done that. again as i mentioned earlier, to get our customers to fund all these capital projects we did up a contract with them. this is what you're getting and this is what you're going to pay for. that
>> well, good morning, good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us. here in the outer sunset on a, what is looking to be a beautiful day, my name is joaquin torres, with the work force development lead intion mayor lee's program look tog coordinate city resources both existing and new to serve our neighborhoods in need and to serve our small business commercial corridors. one of the things that has been so important to the mayor is making sure that we're attentive and listening to the streets and there is certainly no one better to know that than mayor lee who has been both our director of public works, then moved on to being city administrator, and now our mayor of our city. so, to make the announcement of this new program that will benefit merchants and small businesses up and down corridors like the one we're here on today, i'd like to invite further direction, mayor lee. thank you, mayor. (applause) >> thank you. it's great to be out here in sunset out in irving street. i should come out here every week, the dpw folk are cleaning the streets pretty well. [laughter]
culture is "the family". we may have our dysfunctions but our families never dessert us and my family didn't know much with the lgbt issue so when i came out of the closet i thought they would be so upset i would lose them. wouldn't happen. once my son had a sign that said "i love my gay son that never calls" and that is it and i want to welcome the counsel general and his partner and actually we share a vice, and it's called napoli. i think i can say it right. (. [speaking foreign language] . we don't want you to do that but want to work out programs to share our fabulous culture and again thank you. [applause] >> hello. i am honored. i am david chiu president of the board of supervisors. i fall in a long line of succession of italian presidents at the board of supervisors. i am here honored to be supporting our board and my colleague scott wiener and representing the oldest italian neighborhood here on the west coast and i know you have heard from leno and amaino i want you to know my italian friends introduce me as david chiu o. 20 years ago like every elected that didn't
on in the state of california. they normally put us in an alert stat us so we're prepared to respond in an attack mode. i don't often work with chief chaney in southern california, about a month ago we had 9 aircraft at our peak working fires throughout northern california if that answers your question. >> any other responses? >> i wanted to touch -- can you hear me now? i wanted to touch on that last topic as far as the command control because what we have here in the marine corps is similar to the navy. we have the installation, the regional installation command and also partners with the operational foresite. we allow the operational foresight, we maintain those but then we coordinate, cooperate, with the operational foresight once the call comes in for support. so we're able to do that obviously through memorandum of understandings and we have agreements and our wing operating orders allow for the fact the operational control, at least under operational response, maintains with the operators. the third aircraft wing maintains operational control but we send our operatives out to be contr
garden. located just across from the tea garden is the awesome segue tours there are two ways to use a scooter to venture through golden gate park. tour or a rental in the company of a guard that can whiz you through the park tour and see the conservatory of flowers. >> so much fun. woo. >> segways on a echo way to see gold park. check it out and stop by after your tour of the tea garden. it's a great way to play in the park. this way you can chill in the japanese garden go to the tea house and then segway here at golden gate park. >> hi. i am cory with san francisco and we're doing stay safe and we're going to talk about what shelter in place or safe enough to stay in your home means. we're here at the urban center on mission street in san francisco and joined by carla, the deputy director of spur and one of the persons who pushed this shelter in place and safe enough to stay concept and we want to talk about what it means and why it's important to san francisco. >> as you know the bay area as 63% chance of having a major earthquake and it's serious and going to impact a lot
process for us. i just hope and i trust the commissioners can judge our case by the facts, and assure us when we followed the requirements, followed the rules, followed the process, did everything that we could, that there is an end to this and there is a justice to the end. and the process is not being abused. thank you is all for me. thank you. i really appreciate you staying so late and taking this case. we have been waiting this for days. >> thank you. any other speakers in favor of the project sponsor? okay, dr requester you have a two-minute rebuttal. >> thank you. i think what we need to look at here are the decks. and the staircase. the staircase that walks right up and looks into the ramblin's back patio. the decks that have nothing to do with living space. and nothing to do with whether or not the proponent will have space for their family. they want to put decks with glass railings. what they want -- what they are doing is early creating a nice little spa-like environment that allows them to peer into the privacy of their windows. they look into bathroom windows and bedro
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
about the movement, but i don't feel that any of us should be in any position to comment on the specifics of design. at the core of all of this and will be the response to those concerns which are neighborhood concerns. we're not approving architecture. we're approving basically a project which starts with a change of land use. we're going from public to private. from public to residential. so i think we need to kind of stay on target relative to what messages we are potentially communicating here today. >> commissioner antonini? >> but to that end, most of what was pointed out as things under discussion by the neighborhood were the massing and the size of the building, and to some degree the architectural appearance of the building, and so i think that certainly is useful to use our time well and to kind of weigh in on what is being presented to us. not that we're talking about any kind of approval process at this time. we're just sort of trying to indicate our feelings and outreach to the neighborhood. and to the project sponsor to continue to work together. and i d
. these are the folks that we are most thankful for because they give us purpose, and focus for this city and where we need to take it. that is why we build more parks and we invest in our open space. it is for all of these children and the families. i also want to thank all of the sponsors i know three of them are big sports sponsors in the city. and the reflected by the toy train that you see on the side. you will see the caboose, led by golden state warriors. followed by the 49ers. [ applause ] and then two-time world series champions, san francisco giants. [ applause ] >> they give us all of this inspiration and i know that we are looking at some of future players on these teams right here in front of us. so thank you everybody. if i may, during these happy times, when we are thankful for the things that we have and giving thanks for it, please remember the victims that continue to suffer on the east coast. and they are having a hard time it is very cold over there do anything that you can to help them. there are fellow citizens, they all wish that they could be here tonight. i am absolutely sure
, will you tell us about that? >> from our perspective we had the right people in the right place. as we saw during the medical exercise yesterday, ocean beach has a good many advantages for both the city of san francisco and for the military to facilitate disaster relief. i would say during the exercise also as many people have pointed out, building relationships was the highlight of the day and the planning process. we learned a lot about each other, capabilities and processes. i would also say that during the day we focused on how a command post should operate. within the marine corps and the military, we talk about commander's sbept. that gets us past the flow chart diagram or the policy question, it gets to what truly is the outcome that the commander or the mayor in this case is looking for, and that allows everybody in the room to think beyond just the specific problem but to more the holistic solution to the outcome that we're looking for, in this case route clearance. we talked about how to filter information that comes into the coc my experience in disaster relief is the amount
of the fleet week humanitarian exchange. it's been a wonderful way for us to work together on some of these common issues and figure out how our agencies are all going to integrate. i think the time and effort that has been expended by both the military planners and also the civilian planners is definitely going to be bearing fruit in years to come when something happens. i know we are quite a bit ahead of time, you are going to have a 20-minute break from now and then our next speaker will come up at that point. thank you again. he heads the baur row of medicine for the navy. i lacked at his bay oh in the program, educated in georgia and he's had a great career in the navy commanding several hospitals, winning several awards and his most recent command was as the commander of walter reed, and i was so glad that he was here to hear the panel that we had with our medical peer to peer exercise. and he's going to talk to us now about navy medicine. with that, please help me welcome vice admiral matthew nathan. (applause). >> thank you, general, very much. well, it's a pleasure he
request for conditional use authorization >> good afternoon commissioners to allow the conversion of a two-story dwelling unit for a child-care facility located at 281 harvard street the project sponsor currently operates the polka dot center in bernal heights. the proposed facility would open monday-through friday, and would be operated by three full-time employees. no physical expansion of the existing building is proposed. this project was originally scheduled november 15th but knew to neighbor concerns the project was continued until today to allow the project sponsor an opportunity to work with the neighbors to address concerns. a community meeting was held november 17th. this were 30 people in attendance. some issues raised were regarding parking and traffic and the necessity and desirable of a preschool in the neighborhood and commercial uses in the neighborhood. to address parking and traffic concerns from the neighbors, staff has added a condition of approval that the project sponsor shall apply for a white passenger loading zone. along the 50' street frontage in front
general hughes had briefed us that the chinese military were to begin extensive military maneuvers in the taiwan strait. this morning we were stunned to learn that they had fired two missiles that landed just 10 miles off the coast of taiwan. the taiwanese had a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an
community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going to keep getting elected to office if we don't work on that and focus on that, we'll quickly slide back. so, we're here today to remember and also to look forward. so, it is my great honor to turn the mic over to our mistress of ceremonies, one of harvey's legislative aides and now the director of emergency management in san francisco and one of my absolute favorite people in city hall, the great ann kronenberg. [cheering and applauding] >> i have to move this mic down a little bit, supervisor. welcome. thank you all so mu
partial views of the water. we paid for those views. all of us paid for those views, okay? the proposed addition, not just the floor, because if you look at the plan, it's not just an additional flash, floor, but the solar panels. you are almost looking at adding two floors, not one. they block the water view and i know right to view not necessarily, but what about right to value? we pay taxes and we pay taxes on property and property is high because you have a view. well, with this thing we will no longer have any views. and the question also is addition to solar panels under the draft motion it says, "the project is desirable as in keeping with the neighborhood character of tall multi-unit buildings." what about the neighborhood character that isn't next door to the building? what about the neighborhood character of people like us on jackson street on which there are multiple buildings that face this view? we're all affected by this one owner, one singular addition for one families. we're not talking about adding more space for families, but a penthouse for some owner who will block
are local. somewhere there's a little girl or little by or grandmother that is counting on us to get it right. so i thank you in advance for that young boy, that young girl, that family, whose lives will be changed, whose lives may even be preserved, because of your efforts. thank you for inviting me here today, thank you for allowing me to learn from you, thank you for allowing me it share a little bit about what we do and mostly to simply say thank you, it was my pleasure to be here, secretary schultz, thank you, admiral beeman, thank you. ladies and gentlemen, that's all i have. if you have any questions i'll be happy to take them. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm naomi kelly, city administrator for the city and county of san francisco and it's an honor to be participating in this important panel discussion on the uss macon island. over the course of t
too well, so they still had to use the facility but they housed the personnel in two tents out in front. their headquarters is one tent and their dorm is another tent and they welcomed us in there, didn't even think twice. and in the story of what it was like there, for a community of nearly 700,000 people, their complete complement of fire fighters that were on duty, their professional staff, was just over 40. they had 4 pieces of apparatus. the newest of which was over 10 years old. they kept it together literally with duct tape and baling wire and that's what they did every day. and i asked them, how was it after the earthquake. and he said, well, you know, most of them lost their homes too. nobody here was untouched. they all lost family in the rubble, they all lost their homes, but they all came to work. every one of them went out and worked every day until they got as many people recovered as possible and even then most of them just moved into the fire station because they didn't have anywhere else to go. and even then it didn't stop because now you have people l
about discretionary review thresholds and looking at necessary/desirable conditional use i have a hard time impacting so many people without a clearer articulation of what the net benefit actually. >> commissioner antonini? >> i think for the other tenants there are some benefits just looking at the new rendering. the whole facade on the outside has changed. it's much more attractive. you have french windows as opposed to whatever those windows are now there and they don't look very good. you have got the fires escapes in the inside are placed in different locations and it appears that the railings are much more attractive and just viewing the building from the outside, it looks like a lot more pleasant place to live. it looks like the entire exterior is being changed. and there is a much nicer treatment to the outside of the building. >> commissioner sugaya? >> i think as far as impact, i mean, the architect did point out on property line windows that the other properties don't enjoy that either because it happened to be at the time that they built the build they couldn't put the
conditional use that said repeatedly in order to avoid confusion, it will not be a bar. the noise problem was brought to my attention, apart from the fact that i hear it when i go by there with the windows and doors open by many people and certainly by the managers in the building; when i went there on a different purpose that the elders there really suffer. i brought you some of the statements of support, okay? there is a petition, signed by people all over the city, and? in the greater nob hill area and nobody nearby within a block or two blocks except one i see on the page. statements on the black, i want to change the verbiage from wine-tasting to wine bar. now you can say it doesn't add a bar, but it does really. he added a bar that wasn't supposed to be there. the police and abc objected to him having a later time on. it anyway, let me give you this. while he was adding entertainment and extending the time that i asked to have it investigated. christine hall responded this is the investigation of the violations and it doesn't sound like that to me. also, all of these reports of sup
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